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Yoga for Back Injury

    Table of Content
  1. Sphinx pose
  2. Cat/cow pose
  3. Downward-Facing Dog
  4. Cobra Pose

Yoga is a low-impact, effective way to relax tight muscles and build strength—which can help relieve back pain in case of back injury and also relaxes the muscles. Yoga is a mind-body therapy that’s often recommended to treat not only back pain but the stress that accompanies it. The appropriate poses can relax and strengthen your body.Try these beginner-level poses and see if you find relief. Remember to take it slow and stop if the pain gets worse. Keep reading to learn more about how these poses may be useful in treating back pain.

1. Sphinx pose

Sphinx pose

The sphinx pose puts your lower back muscles in a more relaxed position and is sometimes recommended for people who have sciatica pain from a herniated disc. You need to lie on the ground, so use a yoga mat or thick towel.

Repeat this pose as you are comfortable. Gradually work your way up to 30 seconds per repetition.

2. Cat/cow pose

Cat/cow pose

Cat and cow are 2 different yoga poses, but they are typically practiced together. Here’s how to do them:

Together, these poses form a gentle yet effective stretch for your lower back.

3. Downward-Facing Dog

Downward-Facing Dog

This traditional forward bend can be restful and rejuvenating. Practicing this pose can help relieve back pain and sciatica. It helps to work out imbalances in the body and improves strength

This pose helps lengthen your back muscles.

4. Cobra Pose

Cobra Pose

This gentle backbend stretches your abdomen, chest, and shoulders. Practicing this pose strengthens your spine and may soothe sciatica. It may also help to relieve stress and fatigue that can accompany back pain.

Does it really reduce back pain?

One small study from 2017Trusted Source assessed the effects of either yoga practice or physical therapy over the course of one year. The participants had chronic back pain and showed similar improvement in pain and activity limitation. Both groups were less likely to use pain medications after three months. Separate research from 2017Trusted Source found that people who practiced yoga showed small to moderate decreases in pain intensity in the short term. Practice was also found to slightly increase participants’ short- and long-term function. Though the research is hopeful, further studies are needed to confirm and expand upon these findings.